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High-speed, high-res method allows rapid imaging of a living brain

Using a new high-speed, high-resolution imaging method, researchers at Washington University were able to see blood flow, blood oxygenation, oxygen metabolism, and other functions inside a living mouse brain at faster rates than ever before.

Fast-functional-PAM

The new method is called “photoacoustic microscopy” (PAM), a single-wavelength, pulse-width-based technique developed by Lihong Wang, PhD, the Gene K. Beare Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and his team.

PAM allows for capturing images of blood oxygenation 50 times faster than their previous results using fast-scanning PAM, reported on KurzweilAI in November.

The new technology is also 100 times faster than their acoustic-resolution system, and more than 500 times faster than phosphorescence-lifetime-based two-photon microscopy (TPM).

The results were published March 30 in Nature Methods advanced online publication.

Photoacoustic-microscopyPhotoacoustic microscopy of oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the mouse brain, acquired by using the single-wavelength pulse-width-based method with two lasers. SV = skull vessel. (credit: Lihong Wang, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis)

Most importantly, PAM allowed 3-D blood oxygenation imaging with capillary-level resolution at a one-dimensional imaging rate of 100 kHz, or 10 microseconds.

“Using this new single-wavelength, pulse-width-based method, PAM is capable of high-speed imaging of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin,” Wang said. “In addition, we were able to map the mouse brain oxygenation vessel by vessel using this method.”

Blood-flow dynamics and oxygen metabolism at the level of individual cells

“Much of what we have learned about human brain function in the past decade has been based on observing changes in blood flow using functional MRI,” said Richard Conroy, PhD, program director for Optical Imaging at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

“Wang’s work dramatically increases both the spatial and temporal resolution of photoacoustic imaging, which now has the potential to reveal blood flow dynamics and oxygen metabolism at the level of individual cells. In the future, photoacoustic imaging could serve as an important complement to fMRI, leading to critical insights into brain function and disease development.”

To read the complete article: http://www.kurzweilai.net/high-tech-method-allows-rapid-imaging-of-functions-in-living-brain?utm_source=KurzweilAI+Weekly+Newsletter&utm_campaign=768cc1d78d-UA-946742-1&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_147a5a48c1-768cc1d78d-282002409

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This entry was posted in: Artificial Intelligence

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I made my bones as an advertising copywriter. My TV, radio and print ads have amused millions of people and helped sell tons of cleaning products, coffee, macadamia nuts and other goodies. But I prefer that other kind of fiction: short stories and novels. My first published novel, Mindclone, is a near-future look at the amusing and serious consequences of brain-uploading. It’s garnered mostly five star reviews. The sequel is percolating in my brain even now. Stay tuned.

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